Who Owns a Photo? Image Copyrights Explained in One Infographic

Who Owns a Photo? Image Copyrights Explained in One Infographic

Photography copyright law can be confusing. Learn the most important points in this easy-to-read infographic.

Ever since British photographer David Slater had his camera snatched by a primate in Indonesia, the subject of image copyrights has been a hot debate. The crested black macaque who grabbed Slater’s camera accidentally took a selfie, and photographers have since argued whether the resulting image belongs to Slater or the public domain.

Check out the latest on copyright law in this helpful infographic by Clifton Cameras and tell us what you think: Should David Slater own the copyright to his animal-snapped selfie?

who-owns-a-photo-copyright-law-monkey-creative-commons


Image credit
© Clifton Cameras
Written by Hillary Fox

Founder of OnGoingPro, Hillary Fox is an international travel photographer and entrepreneur currently residing in Cape Town, South Africa. Visit her site at hillaryfox.com.

  • sally brighten

    If you “disable right clicking” you deserve everything negative thing that happens to you

    • Michael Blitch

      Based on what? If you attempt to keep others from infringing one your work, they why are you suggesting that the victim be punished?

  • FotoFan

    You mentioned that when you post a photo on FB that you automatically give them license to use your photo. What about Facebook users who take your photos or manipulate the without permission.

    • FotoFan, I wrote about this recently because it’s happened to me quite often. It’s very easy to have your unauthorized work removed from Facebook with a simple DMCA claim. Check out this article to see how it’s done: http://ongoingpro.com/copyright-find-stolen-photos-online-reverse-image-search/

    • Michael Blitch

      Any agreement I have with FB to display a photo does not extend to third parties. No user is allowed to then copy or manipulate a photo without the authorization of the copyright holder.

  • Grendel99

    If an “automatically” taken photo doesn’t have a copyright, then what about images taken by ‘trail’ cameras (motion sensing), or security cameras, or pictures taken with an intervalometer?

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